This is the final installment of my three part series on the Kamloops Flavours Trail, allowing visitors to get a feel and taste for the flavours of our region. Read about parts 1 and 2 here: Kamloops Flavours Trail Part 1: City Limits and Kamloops Flavours Trail Part 2: East.

You may look at the Flavours Trail brochure, see that the West trail is 480 km (298 mi) long, and wonder whether all that driving is worth it for the tastes in between. I’m here to tell you that it is! The stunning scenery you pass while driving the Flavours Trail West is what sets it apart from the others.

That said, to truly appreciate this incredible region I recommend you consider an overnight stay along the route and split the drive into two days. There are plenty of things to see and do if you have the extra time.

So grab a coffee, buckle up, and get ready to take a tour of the trail with me!


Drive along Kamloops Lake. Photo: Amber Harding
Drive along Kamloops Lake

After a stunning drive from Kamloops past pretty Kamloops Lake, the first stop is Suede Hills Organic Farm. Suede Hills is not only an organic farm, but all of their products are completely vegan!

Insider Tip: Be sure to check their hours, as the farm is not open on weekends.

If you time it right, you’ll likely be getting ready for some lunch and/or pie after Suede Hills, which makes the next stop – Horstings Farm Market just outside of Cache Creek – perfect. We were very ready to eat and enjoyed amazing homemade sandwiches, soup, and pie with ice cream on their back deck, while admiring the view of the hills and orchards around us. We may have eaten our pie and ice cream first!
 

Horstings Farm Market near Cache Creek. Photo: Amber Harding
Horstings Farm Market

The next part of the drive, Cache Creek to Lilloeet, is the most beautiful of the whole trail, and the 88 km (55 mi) through the mountains passes in the blink of an eye. I wish we’d had our kayak and fishing gear to spend a couple of hours on Pavilion Lake. Next time!

 Pavilion Lake in Marble Canyon. Photo: Amber Harding
Pavilion Lake

Your next stop is the Fort Berens Estate Winery. This is where having some extra time built into your day is important. We would have loved to enjoy a glass of wine on the patio, but we had a lot of driving ahead of us so we opted for a tasting. Next time I would break the trip up and plan to camp at Marble Canyon Provincial Park or Sky Blue Resort on Pavilion Lake, then spend an entire afternoon on the patio at Fort Berens Winery enjoying their food and wine!

The view from the tasting room at Fort Berens Estate Winery in Lillooet. Photo: Amber Harding
Check out the view of the mountains from the tasting room!

 The vineyard at Fort Berens Estate Winery in Lillooet. Photo: Amber Harding
The vineyard.

After purchasing two bottles of wine (the Chardonnay and the Reisling), we headed back toward Ashcroft. Our next stop: Desert Hills Ranch. This is their main location (a second is right beside Horstings Market outside of Cache Creek), and it’s a perfect place to pick up some fresh fruit for the rest of your drive and visit their baby animals.

Heading out of Lillooet and back to Ashcroft. Photo: Amber Harding
Heading out of Lillooet and back to Ashcroft.

From Ashcroft, continue to Spences Bridge and visit Hilltop Garden Farms & Campground. Because we did the tour on a Sunday, we were unable to visit this stop as they were closed. It’s located on a heritage site, the former home of world-famous ethnographer James Teit.

I hate to pick favourites, but the last stop on the tour may have been my favourite. Left Field Cider Company is located on Highway 97C, which is a quiet, beautiful stretch of road that runs between Logan Lake and Merritt.

Left Field Cider Company between Merritt and Logan Lake. Photo: Amber Harding
This little cider company has the most tranquil outdoor picnic area overlooking the orchard.

Apparently if you give them 24 hours notice, they will prepare a picnic for you. We had a great time tasting (and purchasing!) six different ciders.

Left Field Cider Company between Merritt and Logan Lake. Photo: Amber Harding
I will be back, Left Field Cider!

Seven hours, five stops and 480 kilometres (298 miles) later, we were home. Whew! I was more than happy to crack the Chardonnay from Fort Berens and settle in for a glass of wine at the end of the day. As we get into fall and the leaves start changing, this drive will become even more beautiful. Don’t let the distance intimidate you. I promise – it’s worth it!

Written by Amber Harding, blogger for Destination British Columbia

 

This is the final installment of my three part series on the Kamloops Flavours Trail, allowing visitors to get a feel and taste for the flavours of our region. Read about parts 1 and 2 here: Kamloops Flavours Trail Part 1: City Limits and Kamloops Flavours Trail Part 2: East.

You may look at the Flavours Trail brochure, see that the West trail is 480 km (298 mi) long, and wonder whether all that driving is worth it for the tastes in between. I’m here to tell you that it is! The stunning scenery you pass while driving the Flavours Trail West is what sets it apart from the others.

That said, to truly appreciate this incredible region I recommend you consider an overnight stay along the route and split the drive into two days. There are plenty of things to see and do if you have the extra time.

So grab a coffee, buckle up, and get ready to take a tour of the trail with me!

- See more at: http://blog.hellobc.com/kamloops-flavours-trail-part-3-west/#sthash.xNggTQxG.dpuf